Creating a Student Avatar or Persona

Creating a Student Avatar or Persona

At OTrain, we run a series of training programs via our Training Success Club that show people how to create their own online training.  These programs are based on the exact process we use to create online courses for clients, and the same process we use to work with clients developing their own courses. To date, this approach has been used to develop over 400 courses, so it’s fair to say we’ve had a little experience, and we’ve seen a few things. It doesn’t matter the subject matter, or the client, or the budget, or the experience of the designer when it comes to creating an online course, we always start with the same question: TELL US ABOUT THE AVERAGE STUDENT?   See most people run off and start thinking about themes and templates, interactions and assessments and start getting into the nuts and bolts of the course design.  But designing an online course should always start with the student in mind. At OTrain we start with what we call a Student Avatar.  This is an idea or concept borrowed from marketing.  We look at who is the typical student that is going to undertake our course?  Sure our course could be taken by ANYONE, but the reality is there are usually a fairly defined set of characteristics for the ‘average’ student. The more we can define these characteristics, the more we can build our course to meet the students specific needs.  This is a basic fundamental practice of training, but something often overlooked and lost when creating an online course, especially when we get dazzled by all the pretty options...
Adobe Captivate joins with Adobe Stock

Adobe Captivate joins with Adobe Stock

Adobe Captivate joins with Adobe Stock At OTrain we use Adobe Captivate as our preferred Authoring Tool to create great online courses. Last week Adobe launched an update to Adobe Captivate 9. The updated version of Captivate offers: Performance Improvements – With the latest updates to Adobe Captivate 9, performance and slide load time on devices gets a boost. This version shows an improvement of 2.6x on slide load time. As well as performance improvements Adobe Captivate has joined with Adobe Stock, so finding the perfect images just got a whole lot easier. With the addition to 50,000+ free assets they have already given you when joining with the eLearning Brothers, you can also download assets from your Adobe Stock subscription within Captivate 9 Assets tab as well. If you do not have an Adobe stock subscription you can get the basic package from $35.99 per month for 10 images. As well as these Adobe have created a brand-new Adobe eLearning Community. A perfect way to browse relevant information with blogs, tutorials and product conservations there is plenty to explore. You can access the community from the top toolbar in Adobe Captivate. Click here to join https://elearning.adobe.com/?trackingid=4NM89DWT&mv=email&promoid=70114000002KaLLAA0 If you do not have Adobe Captivate 9 yet, you can download a free 30 day trial from here https://www.adobe.com/au/products/captivate/download-trial/try.html. You can get the full version on a monthly subscription of $34.99 a month. So once again, Adobe have lifted the bar, proving why Captivate is one of the preferred Authoring tools for online course development worldwide. If you’re interested in Captivate, why not join our ‘Create your own online training course’...
10 Sleep Hacks Every Student Needs to Know

10 Sleep Hacks Every Student Needs to Know

A handy tool for the student toolbox is a few sleep hacks.  If there is one thing that goes hand in hand with that pile of text books it’s lack of sleep. Whether it’s pulling an all nighter finishing off that assignment due tomorrow or celebrating the night with friends.  There is usually one reason or another that sleep didn’t seem all that important at the time. Sleep deprivation can make it very difficult to succeed, having an adverse affect on your mental health, concentration and memory. SleepPeople.com have put together a great infographic ’10 Sleep Hacks Every Student Needs to Know’ which provides students with some great tips for getting the best nights sleep possible. A great night sleep is a very important requirement and should be a focus for any student wanting to succeed at learning.  ...
How to Use Cinemagraphs in eLearning

How to Use Cinemagraphs in eLearning

Some great tips from Chris Pappas, Founder of The eLearning Industry Network, on how to use cinemagraphs in eLearning. The original article can be found here, but just in case it is moved we have copied it to our Blog below. Here’s Chris’s 5 Tips To Use Cinemagraphs in eLearning. How To Use Cinemagraphs In eLearning: 5 Tips For eLearning Professionals The term “cinemagraph” was first introduced by two American photographers, Kevin Burn and Jamie Beck. Cinemagraphs are a unique blend of video, GIF, and static image. In essence, they are a subtle GIF that features smoother and more focused animations. Typically, only one area of the image is in motion. For example, a cinemagraph might depict an autumn landscape with a single leaf falling from a tree in the foreground. There are also some cinemagraphs that are a bit more interactive. These feature short video clips that are edited down to depict a specific motion or step in a process. In many respects, cinemagraphs help to make eLearning experiences more interactive and immersive. Instead of just looking at a standard image, learners are treated to a moving picture that immediately grabs their attention and creates an emotional connection. In fact, one of the most significant benefits of using cinemagraphs in your eLearning course is that online learners simply do not expect them. While many eLearning courses feature eLearning videos or pictures, cinemagraphs are rarer and offer a more artistic feel. It catches them off guard, so that they are compelled to actively participate in the eLearning process. 5 Tips To Use Cinemagraphs In eLearning Grab their attention with a...

Does Your Online Training Contain Flash Files

Does your Online training contain Flash files? Google (Chrome) and Mozilla (Firefox) both announced last week that their web browsers will no longer natively support Adobe Flash. This change will directly impact online training courses that contact Flash files. Whilst Apple and Google have long had a policy of not supporting Flash on their mobile devices, this is the first time the other major browsers have boycotted the popular format. This is an important development because a lot of online training programs still contain Flash files to help deliver Videos, Animations and other interactions. If your online training packages were created more than 2 years ago, or have videos, animations or interactions that include the likes of “hover over” activities, there is a good chance that its using Flash files. Even courses published to SCORM, will most likely contain some Flash files, which may mean that they will not work on the latest version of Chrome and Firefox, without the student having to download the additional Flash plugin. The reason for this change of position is that Flash has a number of vulnerabilities that makes it an ideal delivery vehicle for viruses and cyber attack. Whilst Adobe is working to close the vulnerabilities, there is a growing call for the removal of the outdated technology from the internet all together, including calls by Facebooks Chief of Security. Of course Flash currently still works on older versions of the browsers, or in the latests versions that have the Flash Plugins downloaded but its fair to say that like so many other technologies Flash’s time may fast be running out. If...

All the parts in eLearning – Putting the pieces together

Computer people have a habit of confusing normal people, and making things more complex then they need to be. For example, a few years ago we all used the internet and we had programs we accessed to make that happen. Now its the cloud, (before that the web) and the programs are call “Software as a Service”, “SaaS”  or “Apps” (formerly Applications). By the time you finish reading this article, there will probably be another set of names to add even more confusion. At OTrain we like to keep things simple, in plain speaking that everyone can understand. So when a client asked us to explain all the pieces recently, we thought it was a great opportunity to try and right a few wrongs, and provide a clear overview of all the parts that go into making up your online presence, including your Training. So the following is our attempt to “simplify the cloud”. Server – Whether “in the cloud” or “in the corner” your website and other web based programs including your Learning Management System (LMS) lives on a physical piece of hardware (or computer) somewhere, called a server. Things get a little more complicated today with the idea of “cloud servers” or “shared racks” but when you boil it all down, its simply a computer of some sort, somewhere, connected to the internet. If you think about this in an offline sense, the server might be considered the block of land on which you build your office or factory.  With OTrain, you don’t need to worry about a server, as our products are hosted – which means...